Brain Food to Beat Depression and Anxiety- Off the Record with Annie Tevelin

I had such a wonderful time talking with Annie Tevelin on the Off the Record podcast. Annie is an entrepreneur and CEO of her skincare company Skin Owl. We discussed my new book, Eat to Beat Depression and Anxiety and had a really meaningful conversation about mental health. 

Annie is a kind soul and an easy person to talk to about mental health and the role that food can play in it. I especially appreciated her openness about her own mental health journey and her enthusiasm! We ended the episode discussing some practical steps that listeners can take to start improving their diet and mental health. 

You can listen to the episode on Apple or Spotify. 

SHOW NOTES

  • [14:02] Has mental well being changed as food has been modified over time? 
  • [18:24] What has me worried for the future of mental health 
  • [24:12] What the chapter “Eater Heal Thyself” in my book is all about
  • [26:12] Our thoughts on the show, The Biggest Loser
  • [30:05] We talked about what male mental health will look like going forward 
  • [37:20] How I feel about everyone following their passions early on in life
  • [40:50] Practical places to start your nutritional psychiatry journey
  • [43:02] Difference between eating for anxiety and eating for depression
  • [49:23] What’s next for me and our brand

QUOTES

  • [22:24] “The hope is that you are nourishing the brain and nourishing a lifestyle in a way that best insulates you from the more pathological end of those (pandemic worry) feelings” 
  • [24:19] “I really hope people see the invitation for nutritional psychiatry is to become your own eater” 
  • [26:10] “You get a better result for yourself and other people when you approach things from a stance of love.”
  • [41:34] “The best way to assess your diet is really sit down and think about breakfast, lunch and dinner and just what are your go-to and just be honest about it.”

Drew Ramsey, MD

Drew Ramsey, M.D. is a psychiatrist, author, and farmer. He is a clear voice in the mental health conversation and one of psychiatry’s leading proponents of using nutritional interventions. He is an assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

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