My Interview on Been Better… hbU? Podcast with Katie Nehra

I recently got to talk with Katie Nehra on her podcast, Been Better…hbU? I had a great time with her talking all things brain, food, and depression.

Katie and I discussed prescription drugs, BDNF, weight gain, and where to start when it comes to trying bi-valves. Also, we each shared a couple of our simplest and favorite recipes that just so happen to be great for our brains.

We both opened up about our struggles with our mental health which made for an honest conversation. Conversations like this one I feel are helping fight stigma and bias in the mental health space. This conversation is worth a listen!

You can listen to the episode on Apple or Spotify.

SHOW NOTES:

  • [03:04] My thoughts on coffee
  • [06:28] What you should be eating everyday
  • [07:41] What I think about intermittent fasting
  • [12:30] We talk about how important it is to find the perfect mental health clinician for you
  • [13:50] I talk about all the different therapists I’ve had throughout my life
  • [14:40] Psychodynamic therapy explained
  • [18:45] What does BNDF do and why is this so inspiring
  • [25:00] What foods trigger BDNF
  • [28:00] Top source of vitamin B12
  • [33:35] Meat and the environment dilemma

QUOTES:

  • [09:04] “There’s this real anti pharmaceutical, anti medicine movement that leads up to really bias and discrimination against patients who or people who make those choices.” 
  • [11:45] “For anybody who’s listening who’s been in that dark spot, you’ve got to always remember and keep in your mind that there’s a lot more out there, there’s another day, there’s a lot of treatment options.”
  • [19:23] “Psychotherapy increases BDNF.”
  • [26:05] “Three of the top five anti-depressant foods on the animal protein side are mussels, clams and oysters.”

Drew Ramsey, MD

Drew Ramsey, M.D. is a psychiatrist, author, and farmer. He is a clear voice in the mental health conversation and one of psychiatry’s leading proponents of using nutritional interventions. He is an assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

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